Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 22nd World Dermatology Congress Tokyo, Japan.

Day 1 :

  • Pigmentation

Session Introduction

Natasha Tsekova Traykovich

University Hospital of Oncology, Bulgaria

Title: Pigmented lesions- challenges and difficulties in dermatology practice
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Natasa Tsekova is head of Department of Oncodermatology and Dermatosurgery in University Hospital of Oncology, Sofia- Bulgaria. Her area of emphasis are skin cancer- diagnostic and treatment, dermatosurgery and adverse reaction during systemic treatment in cancer patients.  She published her works in numerous national and international journals. Аlso participates in various international conferences and trainings in order to make the acquired knowledge and practices useful for patients and shared with colleagues. Dr. Tsekova makes great efforts to apply all modern diagnostic and treatment methods in oncodermatological practice and make them accessible for patients in Bulgaria.

 

Abstract:

Differentiation of pigmented skin lesions, benign and malignant, is not a difficult approach and can be done only with a clinical examination by an experienced dermatologist. Proper and fast diagnosis is essential because it can increase patient survival, especially in malignant melanoma. In recent decades, dermatoscopy has developed to a state-of-the-art method for evaluating pigmented skin lesions and following well-defined criteria helps the confirmation of diagnosis.

Sometimes diagnosis of  pigmented lesions is a challenge, especially when the lesions are localized on the palmoplantar surface, nail matrix, or occur in children. For patients with large congenital melanocytic nevi, the risk of developing melanoma (cutaneous or extracutaneous) is estimated to be 5–10% over a lifetime, with approximately half of this risk during the first 5 years of life. Nevi that involve the nail matrix can present as longitudinal melanonychia, a tan, brown or black streak caused by increased melanin deposition in the nail plate. Although streaks that develop in childhood are usually benign, single bands that are dark in color or wide (6 mm), become darker or wider with time, are associated with nail dystrophy, or have extension of pigmentation beyond the nail fold warrant biopsy of the nail matrix to exclude melanoma. Sometimes difficult in practice is the diagnosis of Spitz nevi. Spitz nevi are benign, usually acquired proliferations of melanocytes with histopathologic features that sometimes overlap with those of melanoma. Therefore, proper diagnosis is essential.

Just as the evaluation of skin lesions at special anatomical sites can be demanding, some melanoma subtypes are particularly challenging to diagnose.

To avoid unnecessary worry, dermatologist need to be aware of the natural history and clinical spectrum of melanocytic nevi as well as features of pigmented lesions and patient phenotypes that should raise concern.

  • Skin Infections and Skin Cancer
Biography:

She is the Director and Founder Possitive Vibes. 

Abstract:

Background: Consideration of psychiatric and psychosocial factors is important for the management and prevention of dermatologic disorders. Dermatology patients suffer commonly from psychiatric  comorbidity.

Aim:To study pattern and prevalence of psychiatric disorders among patient attending dermatology OPD .

Methods: The study was carried out in Psychiatry department of NIMS Medical college, Jaipur, Rajasthan, a north State of India. The sample was taken from Dermatology department of Medical College. All the participants were diagnosed/confirmed cases of skin. Socio-demographic data was collected .Patients scoring more than 12 on GHQ were examined for presence of psychiatric illness. Patients so identified were administered Indian Psychiatric Interview Schedule (IPIS) to asses profile of psychiatric symptoms in detail. Diagnosis were derived from symptom clusters elicited by IPIS according to International Classification of disease –tenth revision (ICD-10). 

Findings: As per ICD-10 diagnosis 34.2% of total sample were diagnosed with definite Psychiatric comorbidity. Maximum number of cases were of Depression 36.32% (N=146) followed by Anxiety disorder 18.41% (74) and 7.96% (N=32) with Somatoform disorder. Obsessive compulsive disorder was diagnosed in 6.47% (N=26) followed by Adjustment disorder 4.98% (N=20) and Alcohol dependency 4.98% (N=20). Minimum number of cases belonged to Schizophrenia 2.99% (N=12) and Bipolar Affective disorder 2.99% (N=12). No diagnosis was found in 14.93% (N=60).

Conclusion: Significant psychiatric comorbidity exist in patients of dermatology. Biopsychosocial approach to patients with skin disease should be sought by liaison between psychiatrist and dermatologist.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Christeen Youssef graduated with a degree of Bachelor of Medicine and Surgery and subsequently taken her Master of Science in Dermatology and Venereology from the reputable Zagazig University in Egypt. Her dedication to Dermatology and Aesthetic Medicine continuously inspires young doctors as she shares her expertise as an Associate Professor of Dermatology in the same institution since 2005 till present. As well respected Aesthetic and Dermatology Specialist in the UAE and abroad, Dr. Christeen Youssef is an advocate of true clinical results through safe and scientifically proven medical practice.

 

Abstract:

Cutaneous fibrosis or Scars develop as a result of suboptimal wound healing after serious tissue injuries such as extreme burns, trauma, and major surgery leading to prolonged inflammatory responses and pathological fibroproliferative responses in wounds.

The latest studies have investigated molecular regulators at each phase of wound healing: inflammation, proliferation, and remodelling phases.

Here we reviewed the current literature that illustrate molecular pathways for one of the novel methods for scarless wound healing which is Stromal Vascular Fraction (SVF). SVF contains a large population of stem cells called adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs), that share a number of similarities with bone marrow stem cells, including the capacity for multilineage differentiation.

Scar tissue consists mainly of myofibroblasts formed by fibrillar collagen. Factors that are essential for myofibroblast activation include the availability of active growth factors such as TGFβ1 and PDGF; activation of inflammatory signaling; and mechanical response to stress. Results of studies have been done on animals showed that collagen in the group that had SVF was arranged more regularly with a broader gap between collagens. And also the mRNA expressions of TGF-β and Smad3 in the SVF group were significantly down-regulated. another experiment showed that SVF contains EGF and VEGF cytokines which enhance the ability of keratinocyte cells to migrate and proliferate cells and have obvious effects on depressed scars for clinical use. Trials have been done on human showed also a huge improvement and significant increase in scar tissue score for all the patient who had the SVF injection.

  • Diet in Dermatology

Session Introduction

Ashok Hegde, Prabakaran Ravichandran

ITC Life Sciences and Technology Center, India

Title: Enhanced dermal delivery of vitamin D3 through microencapsulation
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Ashok Hegde has completed his PhD from National University of Singapore, and postdoctoral studies from Institute of molecular and Cell Biology, Singapore and University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA. He is currently a Research Scientist at ITC Life Sciences and Technolgy Center, Bangalore, India. He has about two decades of research experience, and contributed to over fifty patents and publications. His research intereststs are in the area of skin and hair follicle biology.

Abstract:

Vitamin D is an essential micronutrient required for normal human physiology, specifically for calcium absorption, healthy skin and hair follicle growth. Natural way of Vitamin D synthesis in skin upon exposure to sunlight is in the decline due to various factors including sedentary lifestyle, indoor stay, varying food habits, religious and socioeconomic factors. It is further affected by forced indoor stays and working from home situation during these pandemic times. Vitamin D deficiency leads to various physiological conditions including bone pain, skin acne and psoriasis. Large portion of world population is deficient in Vitamin D3 and its deficiency is widely prevalent (70-100%) in Indian population as well. Oral supplementation of vitamin D3 has drawbacks of reduced absorption/bioavailability, short-half life in serum and low amounts available for metabolism. Transdermal delivery has been considered as a potent alternative to oral supplementation. Dermal delivery of novel microencapsulated Vitamin D3 may offer significant benefits in terms of enhanced bioavailability at the target sites (deep layers of skin, hair follicles and sweat pores), with decreased toxicity. Preliminary in vitro studies from our lab have shown enhanced accumulation of microencapsulated Vitamin D3 in HaCaT cells and 3D skin. Further studies are in progress to ascertain the transdermal absorption and potential bioavailability through a microencapsulated composition.

  • Current Research in Dermatology and Cosmetology

Session Introduction

Edileia Bagatin

Federal University of Sao Paulo, Brazil

Title: Oral antioxidants and nutraceuticals for skin aging control: a critical approach
Speaker
Biography:

Edileia Bagatin is the Professor, Department of Dermatology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

 

Abstract:

Antioxidants derived from plant extracts have been extensively studied in vitro. Based in the experimental results they are proposed as beneficial oral and topical strategy to control, in vivo, the oxidative stress which is the main pathogenic factor in skin aging, particularly photoaging. However, a paucity of randomized and controlled clinical trials are available to assure the same effects. In addition, some harmful events have been reported. Regarding nutraceuticals, the bioactive peptides of collagen or hydrolyzed collagen (HC) has been suggested as an option to restore dermal collagen content. But there is no evidence about their role as preventive or therapeutic measure and when the supplementation should be initiated. In this lecture results of our in vivo studies about clinical use of oral lycopene to prevent skin damage caused by UVB and the supplementation with HC, in menopaused women, to increase dermal collagen, will be presented.

Cynthia O. Edimo

New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine, United States

Title: The Dermatological Aspects of hEDS in Women
Speaker
Biography:

Cynthia Edimo is a rising fourth year medical student at New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine. She previously attended the University of Maryland where she obtained a B.S. in Biological Sciences: Physiology and Neurobiology. Cynthia has a growing interest in Ehlers Danlos Syndrome and is continuing to learn more about it through research. She is interested in not only the dermatological aspects of this rare disease, but also the complications that this disorder casuses throughout the body. Cynthia will be pursuing an Internal Medicine residency upon graduation.

 

Abstract:

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders that may present with a wide range of multi-systemic complaints. Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS), one of the 13 identified subtypes of EDS, is the only variant without a known associated genetic mutation. Review of the literature suggests the five primary dermatological changes associated with hEDS are soft skin, atrophic cutaneous scars, piezogenic papules, hyperextensive stretchability and hematomas. Our paper will address these cutaneous manifestations and delve into how they affect patients, primarily females. Possible consequences and treatment options for these different dermatological changes as well as other skin manifestations such as livedo reticularis and elastosis perforans serpiginosa will also be further explored.

  • Cosmetic Dermatology

Session Introduction

Ehsan Hamifard

Persian Rose Clinic, Iran

Title: Face rejuvenation with nanofat & millifat simultaneously
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Ehsan Hamifard is a cosmetic dermatologist, He is a member of IMA in Dubai, DASIL & WCOCD. He is specialist in fat grafting for face & body.

Abstract:

Nanofat is emulsified (liquefied) and filtered fat. The fat cells have been crushed and filtered out and what remains is a liquid that contains a high concentration of stem cells. Stem cells are undifferentiated biological cells that can differentiate into specialized cells and can divide (through cell division) to produce more stem cells. Stem cells are very important in the regeneration of damaged tissues. Millifat is large parcel sized (2.4 mm and <) fat that is used when structural fat grafts are performed for deep fat compartment filling, filling of the lips, temporal regions, brows, chin, nose, and pyriform.  From last year till now we have used both nonofat & millifat in face rejuvenation simultaneously in more than 500 cases & have achieved very wonderful results. This method can be used instead of other methods of face rejuvenation & face filling due to less costs & natural components.

  • Dermatology

Session Introduction

Ying Zou, Howard Maibach

Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital, University of California San Francisco

Title: Dermal-epidermal Separation Methods: Research Implications
Biography:

Ying Zou has completed her MD & PhD in China and postdoctoral studies from University of California San Francisco, USA. She is the director of Clinic Center of Allergic Dermatoses and vice-directer of skin & cosmetics research department, Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital, a public specilized hospital in Shanghai, China. She has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as a committee member of several academic societies.

 

Abstract:

Dermal-epidermal separation is an important basic investigation technique for pharmacology, toxicology and biology. In order to choose the optimal method for a given research need, we reviewed studies on epidermal separation. PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science were utilized. Different separation systems have been compared, including chemical, enzyme, heat and mechanical separation; each has advantages and disadvantages. Heat is simple but causes thermal damage. Chemical reagents are effective but disturb cellular electrolyte equilibrium. Enzymes provide complete separation, but destroy important components. Mechanical division does not alter physical and/or chemical integrity, but necessitates a relatively large sample and may cause cross-contamination of layers. Thus the appropriate method should be chosen for a given research question, and no single method appears superior for all purposes.